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As claims of sea levels rising became a bit alarming, will we still dream of homes by the coast?

The latest global analysis, published by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), predicted a rise in sea levels by the end of the century of up to 58cm – higher than all previous predictions, which put the rises between 14cm and 43cm. The Association of British Insurers (ABI) warned that many new homes could be “unsaleable, uninsurable and uninhabitable” if they’re built on floodplains. And the Environment Agency has also issued strong warnings that we must avoid inappropriate development in areas at risk of flooding and to direct development away from those areas at highest risk.

Well, we humans have always learned to adopt and cope with whatever circumstances that nature may bring since we first dwelt on this planet.

Despite all the caution and warnings, the Salt House in Essex UK for example stands staring out at the rising sea, undaunted and beautiful. Far from being labelled as a reckless or foolish development, the Salt House has been unanimously lauded. It was recently named one of the best houses in the world by World Architecture News. Last year it was awarded the Manser Medal by the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA), an award for the best one-off house designed by an architect in the UK. The judges said the house was “breathtaking in the rigour of its design, detailing and execution”. There was no mention of the folly of building on a floodplain. One of these houses can be had for a budget of around £450K.

Images of the Salt House Below:
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The house above is built on stilts, so that when the floods come, as they surely will, the water will flow under the house, not into it. The stilts also mean that there are no foundations, which in conventional housing can collapse under the pressure of frequent flooding, while natural drainage on the plot is maintained. It’s architect Alison Brooks says that the inspiration for his indeed innovative design was taken from modernist post-war beach houses in the US.

Stilt houses

are houses raised on piles over the surface of the soil or a body of water. Ever since the Neolithic and Bronze Age, stilt houses were common in the Alpine and Pianura Padana (Terramare) region.

Today, stilt houses are still common in parts of the Mosquito Coast in Northeastern Nicaragua, Northern Brazil, South East Asia, Papua New Guinea and West Africa. In the Alps, similar buildings, known as raccards, are still in use as granaries.
Houses were built on stilts in order to stay dry in case of floods. It is not just that though, the space underneath is used for storage and shade. Stilts provide a “high and dry” home in all circumstances weather it be for livelihood like in the case of the fishermen, style in the case of wealthy capricious individuals, or even avoiding taxes (Palestinians for example pay a property tax according to square footage of their house on the ground only). I suppose this is an obvious loop-hole.
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Image of traditional fisherman huts:
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Images below of a proposed floating villa for the affluent:
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Above are images of super modern transparent houses, what would practically levitate above water. This is a Nurai Water Villa in Abu Dhabi, its modern architectural concept fills the entire space with lots of light and air, and offers an endless sea views as far as the eye can see. The house is complete with an infinity pool and rooftop terrace with a private garden. Approximately 515 square meters, 3 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms, a 2 story dining area and a gourmet kitchen, all for just a bit more than 5 million euros.
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Image below of a Palestinian house on stilts in avoidance of taxes:

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A Variety of stilt houses around the globe from the Southeast  to the Northwest:

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Types of houses on stilts:
Kelong – built primarily for fishing, but often doubling up as offshore dwellings in the following countries: Philippines, Malaysia, Indonesia and Singapore.
Nipa hut – the traditional house-type prevalent in the Philippines although Philippine houses are mostly westernized
Pang uk – a special kind of house found in Tai O, Lantau, Hong Kong, mainly built by Tankas.
Papua New Guinea stilt house – a kind of stilt house constructed by Motuans, commonly found in the southern coastal area of PNG.
Thai stilt house – a kind of house often built on freshwater, e.g. a lotus pond.
Vietnamese stilt house – similar to the Thai ones, except having a front door with a smaller height due to religious reasons.
Palafito – Found throughout South America since Pre-Columbian times.